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Sloppy and Slow Middle Syndrom

You know what is difficult about writing a book....The middle part.
I know how to start my book and I know where it is going to end but the middle is a mess!


So I took to the Internet to get help from other writers about improving the middle part of my book and this is what I found to be helpful:

How To Rescue Your Novel From Its Fatal Effect Sagging Middle By Glen C. Strathy
The middle is just as important as the crisis.
Dramatica notes that a sound plot progresses through 4 major events which correspond to:
The inciting incident
The complication
The crisis
The resolution
These four signposts can further be subdivided, so that each signpost becomes one act in a four-act story. Within this structure, all four acts/signposts are equally important.

Plan.
At the bare minimum, you should decide on the inciting incident, the complication, the climax, and the resolution, before you start writing.
However, they may not be enough. The climax can seem too far away if you're only on chapter 3, and the path that will take you there may be too murky. It's far better to fill in some of the smaller stepping stones ahead of time. That way, as you write, you can keep focused on the next event you are working towards. Aimless exploration can get you lost. Map out the path ahead!


25 WAYS TO FIGHT YOUR STORY’S MUSHY MIDDLE by Chuck Wendig

 FEWER CURVES, MORE ANGLES
The shape of a story — especially the shape of a story’s middle — is a lot of soft rises and doughy plateaus and zoftig falls. Each hill giving way to a bigger knoll. But sometimes, a story needs fewer hills and more mountains. Angles instead of curves. Fangs instead of molars.

INTRODUCE A CHARACTER
Sometimes, a story needs a bit of new blood in the form of a new character — someone interesting. Not, y’know, “Dave the Constipated Cab Driver,” or “Paula the Saggy-Boobed Waitress,” but rather characters with an arc, characters who will have an impact on the story. You don’t need to replace your protagonist (and probably shouldn’t), but a new strong supporting character may grant the story new energy.

INTRODUCE A CHARACTER. . . TO THE GRIM REAPER, MOO HOO HA HA!
Sometimes, a story just needs blood. Kill a character. Off the poor bastard. Axe, bullet, disease, chasm, death-by-irritable-wombat, whatever. Blood makes the grass grow. Bread and circuses, motherf-er.

RELATIONSHIP STATUS: “IT’S COMPLICATED”
The middle can feel like a vernal pool that fails to dry up, turning it into naught but a mosquito breeding ground (aka “skeeter f party”). That’s because there’s no movement of the water; stagnation sets in. One way to “move the water” (note: not a reference to urinating) is to change the relationship between characters. Get them together. Break them apart. Lies! Betrayals! Exposed secrets! New hate! Old love! Unexpected butt-play! Drama and conflict born of that relationship shift can fuel the rest of the story.

Yeah there is so much more from Chuck Wendig but I posted the tips I found most helpful you should check out all his tips here!
I hope this has helped others who are trying to write too. As for me I need to get back to my book.

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